Neurofeedback London – Brighton – Birmingham – Manchester provides Personalised Brain Training.

Kaiser Neuromap based Personalised Brain Training using neurofeedback and brain maps including Brodmann areas and spectral plots

Mental Health issues arise when one or more brain areas are dysrhythmic. 

With a Kaiser Neuromap, we can assess which areas are stressed.  We can then train these areas with neurofeedback. 

Our understanding of the world is governed by how our brain processes sensory information.  Most of the sensory processing is preconscious, that is, before it reaches our conscious awareness.  The more efficient these preconscious processes are, the more easily we can live in the moment and share a reality with others.  Conversely, when sensory processing is inefficient, mental health issues can arise.  

There are over 50 distinct brain areas with specific functions.  When one or more of these becomes dysrhythmic, mental health issues begin to develop.  We can train our brain to be more stable, flexible and adaptive.  

Neurofeedback training is enjoyable, non-invasive and medication-free.  

 

Neurofeedback process explained, illustrating real-time analysis of brain waves and feedback given

Neurofeedback lets us train dysrythmic brain areas.  With sensors comfortably fitted to the brain areas we want to train, we detect brainwave patterns real-time while watching a movie.  When these patterns are inefficient, the volume drops momentarily.  This is the feedback we are giving our brain, short and instantaneously.  The brain area we are training recognises this – while our conscious mind is focussed on the movie – and adjusts its behaviour to restore the normal volume.  With repetition, throughout a session, learning occurs.  Meanwhile our conscious mind is solely focussed on the movie; the training process is passive in this sense.    

The drop in volume is subtle, so we continue to understand the flow of the movie.  No current or electrical stimulation is fed to the brain; sensors simply read brainwaves and the feedback is purely audio-visual.

Neurofeedback training is an evidence-based complementary therapy.  Its efficacy was first demonstrated some 50 years ago, and with advances in technology, training protocols have become more efficient and the feedback method – watching movies – thoroughly enjoyable. 

Rather than engaging the conscious mind, which slows us down, we are training preconscious processes. 

This equips us with the ability to live in the moment and attain our potential. 

Personalised Brain Training is an advanced qEEG brain map-based approach to neurofeedback training developed by the founders of the field.

Neurofeedback London-Brighton-Manchester uses the most sophisticated methods of neurofeedback training. Daniel Webster studied each method under direct supervision of its founders: 

 – the Othmer Method / ILF (Infra-Low Training):  aimed at calming the reticular activating system

 – qEEG brain map based Personalised Brain Training by Dr. David Kaiser to restore functional connectivity.


We train the pre-conscious mind in a non-invasive, medication-free and enjoyable way.

Neurofeedback Personalised Brain Training is a Complementary Approach to treating Neuropsychiatric Disorders.

Neurofeedback: Uses and Applications

Personalised Brain Training is a non-invasive, medication-free way to address cortical imbalances.  With a Kaiser Neuromap, we understand which brain areas are dysrhythmic, and train these with the most advanced neurofeedback methods.  

This provides a more granular approach than categorisation into pathologies.  In fact, many mental health issues present in combination with others, and the diagnostic approach can set rigorous hurdles that often result in distinct labels that don’t necessarily capture the entire picture. 

The vulnerabilities exposed by a brain map may manifest in various combinations of behavioural and mental health issues.  With Personalised Brain Training we look at the brain as a whole.  Treatment is non-specific with respect to psychopathologies.  For ease of navigation and understanding, the following applications are listed below, along with research evidence, in their separate domains.  

Brain Maps and Personalised Brain Training

Kaiser Neuromap brain maps and Brodmann areas

Brain Maps expose Individual Vulnerabilities

With a Kaiser Neuromap, we can identify character traits, vulnerabilities and strengths. 

Different brain areas and networks govern our behaviour.  For example, there are parts of our brain which control mood regulation; spatial distractibility; physiological arousal; our sense of self; self-critical thoughts; anger and emotional attachment; and there are various sources of anxiety.

A brain map shows us which brain areas are behaving immaturely, and thus expose us to vulnerabilities or mental health issues.

Rather than fitting people into categories – diagnosis – we can assess vulnerability to behaviour patterns.  Every brain is different.  A brain map provides a more granular approach to understanding our strengths and weaknesses.

Neurofeedback process explained, illustrating real-time analysis of brain waves and feedback given

Personalised Brain Training with Neurofeedback

Neurofeedback lets us train dysrythmic brain areas.  With sensors comfortably fitted to the brain areas we want to train, we detect brainwave patterns real-time while watching a movie.  When these patterns are inefficient, the volume drops momentarily.  This is the feedback we are giving our brain, short and instantaneously.  

The brain area we are training recognises this – while our conscious mind is focussed on the movie – and adjusts its behaviour to restore the normal volume.  With repetition, throughout a session, learning occurs.  

Meanwhile our conscious mind is solely focussed on the movie; the training process is passive in this sense.    

The drop in volume is subtle, so we continue to understand the flow of the movie.  No current or electrical stimulation is fed to the brain; sensors simply read brainwaves and the feedback is purely audio-visual.

Neurofeedback is preconscious brain training aimed at enhancing our mental, emotional and spiritual health

Neurofeedback trains our Pre-Conscious Mind

 

Rather than engaging the conscious mind, which slows us down, we are training preconscious processes

This equips us with the ability to live in the moment and attain our potential (if we have to resort to conscious control, we are not living in the moment).

Personalised Brain Training is an advanced qEEG brain map-based approach to neurofeedback training developed by the founders of the field.  Taking Othmer Method / ILF training methods further, it employs Default Network Training protocols as developed by David Kaiser.

We take a holistic approach to healthy brain self-regulation, rather than categorisation or diagnosis. 

Neurofeedback is evidence-based complementary therapy with over 2000 PubMed peer-reviewed research reports

Neurofeedback is Evidence-based

Neurofeedback training is an evidence-based complementary therapy.  Its efficacy was first demonstrated some 50 years ago, and with advances in technology, training protocols have become more efficient and the feedback method – watching movies – thoroughly enjoyable. 

Neurofeedback is evidence-based.  It’s first application was discovered in 1971 when it was used to resolve intractable epilepsy. 

There are over 2,000 peer-reviewed research reports on PubMed demonstrating efficacy across a number of pathologies. 

In the US, it is an accepted complementary treatment for many challenges. 

Case Study - ADHD, Suspected Autism, Teenager, Behavioural Issues

Julian, just turned 11, introduced himself with “I’m Julian.  I have ADHD”.  His self-esteem was on the floor. 

Shy and well-behaved, his demeanour contrasted with the behaviour issues his mother deemed most pressing.  Her altercations with Julian were daily, prompted by incidences where things didn’t go as imagined or hoped for by him, and turning into a self-fuelling rage that would spoil the entire weekend.  His focus was poor, conversations marred by distractions (“jibberish”, in her words), relative maturity low for his age group and he fortunately attended a school that catered for his academic performance and social needs.  

A year of psychotherapy almost landed him with an autism assessment, and he hated the various other therapeutic procedures he had to endure that aimed at helping his physical coordination issues. 

Within two weeks, or four sessions, his behaviour had taken a turn; in his mother’s words:

“I wanted to mention that we have noticed improvement with Julian.  He is calmer, less reactive and when he gets frustrated he manages to calm himself down.  Not sure if it’s a temporary thing, but this weekend was all right :)”

Functional connectivity improves with neurofeedback training as measured with a brain map

Far from temporary, his maturation accelerated noticeably in the following weeks.  A family trip was described as “the best vacation we’ve ever had!” by his mother.  While on holiday, he learned to scuba dive, and his parents noticed that he was asking coherent, thoughtful and relevant questions during the instruction.  Anxieties and fears dropped noticeably, attention and focus improved, childish behaviour – such as “class clown” attempts at drawing attention – ceased, and his search for male role models extended into extracurricular activities.  

Julian’s brain maps confirmed the transition he was going through.  He had skipped years of physical maturation that should have taken place, especially in his prefrontal cortex.  Functional connectivity of brain areas responsible for behaviour, focus and sense of self had improved substantially, as – notably – had his motor skills.  Julian’s trajectory has changed from spiralling into lower depths of special needs diagnoses, to establishing a confident, engaged and healthy risk-taking personality.  With these new acquired powers, he is able to shape his own future in a way that helps sustain his progress. 

Does it last?  We all evolve, and life throws us challenges.  Key to improvement is being equipped with the right tools – cortical maturity and functional connectivity in this case – that help us create positive feedback loops within our environment.  Twenty sessions helped liberate this young man immensely.  With neurofeedback training we can address developmental issues.

Case Study - Pre-Menopausal Depression and Betrayal

Linda, 49, had been betrayed by her husband.  The realisation set in just as she had completed an intensive three month project at work and was taking some time off to be more with her family.  In addition, her younger daughter started attending a new school and was noticeably, yet hurtfully striving for more independence.

Linda’s depression resurfaced, the usual bubbly self subsiding into a self-conscious, dampened shadow of herself.  Always a social and entertaining person, she had been to rehab a number of times (“it doesn’t work, but I made great friends there”).  She worried about having incurred brain damage as a result of her excesses, and that this was the moment the world was coming down on her. 

She had tried numerous forms of therapy and was taking a low dose of anti-depressants when she decided to try neurofeedback.

 

AutismSquare

Visibly nervous excitement before the first session quickly subsided, to be replaced with a new sense of calm.  Her sleep improved to levels she could not recall having experienced before, within three sessions.

After five sessions she exclaimed, “it’s worth it”. 

Intrusive, self-critical thoughts subsided and her motivation returned along with focus and deliberation.  A former singer in a band, she started humming tunes to herself again, and there was music playing in the house, replacing the solemn silence.

 

Being on her own was no longer her refuge of choice; instead she rekindled productive relationships, and set aside people and places that were soaking up her energy. 

Linda started to accept her marital situation, redeemed her sense of self-worth, and found a way to make partnership and parenthood work beyond traditional confines. 

Her brain map corroborates the transition:  previously absent alpha peaks emerged visibly, mirroring the cognitive resuscitation she was experiencing.

Neurofeedback training can improve sense of self and cortical functioning

Case Study - Autism, Young Child

Tamy, 3.5 years of age, was suspected of having autistic traits by her parents.  She was not interested in playing with other children, solved hundred-piece puzzles and recognised chemical formulae.  Shy and sensitive to music, she would only want to watch one particular cartoon on her ipad and entered a state of rage in response to disturbance or change.  The family GP had told her parents to wait another year or two before applying for a diagnosis, saying that the symptoms were too mild to tell – she could speak already after all. 

Concerned, her parents decided to try neurofeedback.  A brain map revealed numerous and prominent sources of anxiety and fear, as well as auditory hypersensitivity, focus issues, impulsive aggression and mood dysregulation.  These features are common in autistic children, though non-specific with regard to categorisation.  

We worked on relevant brain areas in one hour stints, which Tamy became more and more accepting of.  Soon we were able to change the content from her favourite (and only) cartoon to comprise a variation of content.  She became calmer, more engaged and started interacting with others in ways her parents were positively surprised by.  Ten sessions had made a tremendous difference, and reshaped a trajectory that sufficiently reassured a young family.

Case Study - Stroke / Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

Claire is a 48-year old female who is three years post-thalamic CVA (ruptured aneurysm).  In particular, her physical symptoms included severe muscle contractures in her wrist and elbows leading to impaired movement, as well as being wheel-chair bound.

After two neurofeedback sessions, she got her wrist and elbow released.  

Claire was getting active elbow extension and shoulder flexion after five sessions.  Pain was also resolved in her hand, which had been a major issue previously.

Functionally, she achieved improved independence in dressing skills, required only minimal assistance with bathing, and was able to walk with a cane.  

After thirty neurofeedback sessions, Claire started walking without her cane. 

Significant improvements (over 50%) included: 

 – Working memory, chronic aching pain, attention deficit

 – reduced night sweats, vertigo and hot flashes

 – improved body awareness, balance, fine motor coordination, muscle spasticity, reflux and chronic nerve pain

 – significantly reduced paranoia

Case Study - Anxiety, Panic Attacks, Insomnia, Coming Off Anti-Depressants

Roslyn had been diagnosed with anxiety, panic attacks, associated insomnia and mild depression.  She was prescribed two anti-depressants – Mirtazapine and and SSRI – which she was able to reduce to a minimum dose over time.  During the last three years however, she had six relapses, each following a similar pattern: Stress (emotional and work-related) and fatigue precipitated intrusive thoughts and worries, setting off a familiar path of insomnia; consequently higher anxiety, increased stress levels leading to panic attacks and depressive symptoms.  The first few episodes were stabilised by resuming Mirtazapine, which helped restore sleep.  The subsequent ones however failed to respond, taking months to stabilise sleep and reduce anxiety, which involved having to take time off work.  In addition, she began to have somatisations, beginning in the spine and ultimately reaching her face.  Migraines began to reappear when she became excessively tired. 

Guided by a brain map, we began doing neurofeedback training twice a week.  Roslyn’s sleep became sound after the second session – “I feel pleasantly knocked out” – and she decided to reduce her Mirtazapine dose gradually in accordance with her prescribing GP.  After eight sessions (four weeks) she was on the lowest dose, and even this left her feeling very groggy in the morning.  Roslyn had regained confidence in her ability to fall asleep, and stopped using Mirtazapine completely.  Her anxiety levels were at their lowest, and she had began to work again, leaving a corporate environment to work with children in a mental health setting – a stressful yet engaging and meaningful activity.  Her motivation had reached new levels, and she felt stable and confident, which showed in her stance and demeanour.  

Ten sessions of neurofeedback training (each two hours) were sufficient to stabilise Roslyn, restore her ability to sleep, and the confidence therein, as well as improving sense of self-worth, focus and motivation.  She has not felt the need to use Mirtazapine again since. 

Case Study - Marriage Problems

Sean and Sairah were going through a difficult patch in their relationship.   

They had endured a year’s worth of noisy renovation work on their doorstep while they were looking after two years of looking after her mother and raising a newborn. 

Self-diagnosed as PTSD, they were loathe to engaging in ‘softer’ therapies at this stage, for multiple reasons. 

A brain map confirmed they both had similar issues with their ability to self-nurture and feel emotionally safe.  Hypersensitivity was also confirmed, which had led to tensions and a lack of sharing emotions with each other.   

Sleep improved after the first sessions, which Sean was tracking with an app as well as realising subjectively. 

Sairah’s stress levels reduced substantially.  The incident whereby she slammed down the plates in her hand out of general and spontaneous overwhelm, never repeated and she became calmer and more relaxed, and able to spend more quality time with her children. 

Twenty sessions brought the two back to a nurturing relationship they were ready to enjoy in time for Christmas.

Case Study - Long Covid

Mary had contracted Covid in January and had almost been hospitalised.  Six months later, she was still working part-time from home and felt like a shadow of her former self. 

She was suffering from fatigue, anxiety and depression, and her sense of smell had not recovered.  Brain fog, which could also be attributable to her perimenopausal stage, significantly reduced her productivity and confidence.

Mary’s sleep improved from the first neurofeedback session, as did her physical stamina. 

Within three weeks, or five sessions, she noticed her sense of smell had begun to return. 

Motivation and focus improved substantially through session ten.  Mary felt reinvigorated and her self-critical thoughts subsided.  “I’m there for my family again!” she commented. 

We did another seven sessions, now spaced weekly, during which Mary remarked that she had never felt a clearer mind before. 

It is not suggested that neurofeedback is a “cure” for issues arising from a Covid infection, and we will never know what caused her sense of smell to return.  However it was reassuring to see how Mary’s general sense of self and well-being had improved during the time we were training.

Neurofeedback is Personalised Brain Training

With a qEEG Brain Map, we can find vulnerabilities, strengths and challenges. 

Neurofeedback training helps improve our sense of self, sleep, mood regulation, memory and focus.  

It is an evidence-based, scientifically proven treatment, medication-free and non-invasive.

The process is enjoyable – while watching a movie of choice, we give feedback to our brain by changes in volume and picture size.  Our brain preconsciously adapts its behaviour and learning occurs.   See here how it works.

The Process:

Step 1: Brain Map

A qEEG recording takes about 45minutes for a 20 minute recording.

A cap with 19 sensors is is fitted to our head and gels inserted to ensure connectivity.  The sensors only read – there is a tiny voltage on the surface of our head that these pick up.  The gels are easily washed out later.  This is also the last time we wear the cap (until a remap after ten sessions); training is done with single sensors. 

We analyse the data with Kaiser Neuromap software which gives us a unique view into character traits and vulnerabilities.  

Findings are presented in a separate one-hour conversation where we discuss the key elements.

Step 2: Neurofeedback

Neurofeedback process explained, illustrating real-time analysis of brain waves and feedback given

 We use a movie of choice as the feedback mechanism – our conscious mind engages with the film, and feedback is delivered by small changes in volume or picture size.  

Our pre-conscious mind adapts its behaviour to preserve the more comfortable volume and picture size, and learning occurs. 

Volume changes are slight, not stop-start, and the process is enjoyable. 

Key is that we are interested in the movie – our conscious mind is engaged with the content, which forms the reward, and our preconscious mind – without our conscious effort – changes its behaviour in response to the feedback.

Capturing the ultradian cycle with neurofeedback Personalised Brain Training using Kaiser Neuromap

A two hour training session allows us to do 90-110 minutes of neurofeedback training during which we can work on various brain sites. 

This captures an entire ultradian rhythm cycle and corresponds to the approximate duration of feature film movies.  

We can start with shorter sessions as appropriate, mainly with children. 

Ideally, we do two or more sessions per week to start with.  

We would expect to see responsiveness within the first few sessions and remap after twenty hours or about ten sessions.  

Generally, we would expect to doing twenty sessions over two months, though this can vary substantially. 

We can also accommodate intensives, where we do two sessions per day over a number of days, and have had good results with these.

 

Personalised Brain Training

Personalised Brain Training respects neurodiversity.

We take a holistic approach to achieving and maintaining mental health and optimal performance. 

With a Kaiser Neuromap, we can identify areas of strength and vulnerability.  

Neurofeedback Therapy is Forward-Looking.

Personalised Brain Training is holistic and forward-looking.

We equip the brain with efficient habits to develop resilience and sense of self.

Our identity is shaped in the present.  Neurofeedback is about learning to live in the moment.

Specifically, we look at functional brain areas.  There are around thirty areas of interest, and we can assess their relative performance both towards new and familiar situations.  

Each brain area governs a part of our performance, identity and social interaction.  

When one or more brain areas are dysrhythmic, that is, not contributing optimally, a vulnerability to certain behavioural patterns emerges.  

When viewed this way, we can obtain a granular picture of a person’s strengths and challenges. 

On the basis of a  qEEG brain map, we can now train the brain with neurofeedback.  Challenges thus become opportunities that can be addressed.  

Neurofeedback training is an evidence-based, effective and non-invasive treatment. 

With neurofeedback training, we show the brain more efficient ways of functioning.  

There are two types of effects:  

 – after a training session, there is generally an improved sense of self, calmness and confidence

 – in general, we have shown the brain a new type of reward – efficient functioning with respect to a particular brain area – and it will gravitate towards situations, projects, people and places that will support this in a virtuous, positive feedback loop

Training success thus depends on our ability to expose ourselves to such new stimuli and free ourselves from external factors that were reinforcing negative conditions.  

The brain now knows to discern what is good, and we enable it to take us there.

Neurofeedback - Two Methods:

Neurofeedback London-Brighton-Manchester uses the most sophisticated methods of neurofeedback training. Daniel Webster studied each method under direct supervision of its founders: 

 – the Othmer Method / ILF (Infra-Low Training):  aimed at calming the reticular activating system

 – qEEG brain map based Personalised Brain Training to restore functional connectivity.

Neurofeedback training is a fast-growing complementary therapy approach.  Daniel Webster of Neurofeedback London-Brighton provides consultations to clinicians looking to enter the field and those seeking further insights into the most advanced neurofeedback technologies.  

One-on-one or group sessions can be tailored to proficiency and interest specificity, including the following topics: 

 – The Human Brain:  Overview of cortical functions by Brodmann Area and how we can train these

 – Neurofeedback Training Overview – Applications, Process and Case Studies

 – Specific Neurofeedback Training Modalities – 

  + ILF / The Othmer Method

  + qEEG-brain Map based Default  Network Training 

Daniel Webster has trained extensively with Sue and Siegfried Othmer in Los Angeles, and David Kaiser.  He practices neurofeedback training with both ILF and Default Network Training modalities, specialising in menopause, autism and schizophrenia, as well as their comorbidities.

Consultations can be scheduled with Daniel – phone +44 (0)7966699430 or email daniel@neurofeedback.io

Introduction to Neurofeedback, ILF / Othmer Method and Brain Maps

Online Course

Neurofeedback is a form of complementary therapy and should not be seen as a replacement for conventional medicine.  qEEG brain map-based neurofeedback training takes a more holistic approach to brain functioning, rather than just focusing on medical symptoms.  It is not intended as a form of diagnosis nor medical intervention nor medical advice per the disclaimer.

Personalised Brain Training - The Philosophy

Personalised Brain Training takes a holistic approach to achieving and maintaining mental health and optimal performance. 

With a Kaiser Neuromap, we can identify areas of strength and vulnerability.  

Specifically, we look at functional brain areas.  There are around thirty areas of interest, and we can assess their relative performance both towards new and familiar situations.  

Each brain area governs a part of our performance, identity and social interaction.  

When one or more brain areas are dysrhythmic, that is, not contributing optimally, a vulnerability to certain behavioural patterns emerges.  

When viewed this way, we can obtain a granular picture of a person’s strengths and challenges. 

On the basis of a  qEEG brain map, we can now train the brain with neurofeedback.  Challenges thus become opportunities that can be addressed.  

Neurofeedback training is an evidence-based, effective and non-invasive treatment. 

With neurofeedback training, we show the brain more efficient ways of functioning.  

There are two types of effects:  

 – after a training session, there is generally an improved sense of self, calmness and confidence

 – in general, we have shown the brain a new type of reward – efficient functioning with respect to a particular brain area – and it will gravitate towards situations, projects, people and places that will support this in a virtuous, positive feedback loop

Training success thus depends on our ability to expose ourselves to such new stimuli and free ourselves from external factors that were reinforcing negative conditions.  The brain now knows to discern what is good, and we must allow it to take us there.

Neurofeedback Personalised Brain Training: The best investment you can make is an investment in yourself
qEEG brain map for personalised brain training in neurofeedback

Brain Maps and Personalised Brain Training

Kaiser Neuromap brain maps and Brodmann areas

Brain Maps expose Individual Vulnerabilities

With a Kaiser Neuromap, we can identify character traits, vulnerabilities and strengths. 

Different brain areas and networks govern our behaviour.  For example, there are parts of our brain which control mood regulation; spatial distractibility; physiological arousal; our sense of self; self-critical thoughts; anger and emotional attachment; and there are various sources of anxiety.

A brain map shows us which brain areas are behaving immaturely, and thus expose us to vulnerabilities or mental health issues.

Rather than fitting people into categories – diagnosis – we can assess vulnerability to behaviour patterns.  Every brain is different.  A brain map provides a more granular approach to understanding our strengths and weaknesses.

Neurofeedback process explained, illustrating real-time analysis of brain waves and feedback given

Personalised Brain Training with Neurofeedback

Neurofeedback lets us train dysrythmic brain areas.  With sensors comfortably fitted to the brain areas we want to train, we detect brainwave patterns real-time while watching a movie.  When these patterns are inefficient, the volume drops momentarily.  This is the feedback we are giving our brain, short and instantaneously.  

The brain area we are training recognises this – while our conscious mind is focussed on the movie – and adjusts its behaviour to restore the normal volume.  With repetition, throughout a session, learning occurs.  

Meanwhile our conscious mind is solely focussed on the movie; the training process is passive in this sense.    

The drop in volume is subtle, so we continue to understand the flow of the movie.  No current or electrical stimulation is fed to the brain; sensors simply read brainwaves and the feedback is purely audio-visual.

Neurofeedback is preconscious brain training aimed at enhancing our mental, emotional and spiritual health

Neurofeedback trains our Pre-Conscious Mind

 

Rather than engaging the conscious mind, which slows us down, we are training preconscious processes

This equips us with the ability to live in the moment and attain our potential (if we have to resort to conscious control, we are not living in the moment).

Personalised Brain Training is an advanced qEEG brain map-based approach to neurofeedback training developed by the founders of the field.  Taking Othmer Method / ILF training methods further, it employs Default Network Training protocols as developed by David Kaiser.

We take a holistic approach to healthy brain self-regulation, rather than categorisation or diagnosis. 

Neurofeedback is evidence-based complementary therapy with over 2000 PubMed peer-reviewed research reports

Neurofeedback is Evidence-based

Neurofeedback training is an evidence-based complementary therapy.  Its efficacy was first demonstrated some 50 years ago, and with advances in technology, training protocols have become more efficient and the feedback method – watching movies – thoroughly enjoyable. 

Neurofeedback is evidence-based.  It’s first application was discovered in 1971 when it was used to resolve intractable epilepsy. 

There are over 2,000 peer-reviewed research reports on PubMed demonstrating efficacy across a number of pathologies. 

In the US, it is an accepted complementary treatment for many challenges. 

Neurofeedback improves Mental and Emotional Capacity

 Now is always a good time for self-reflection and an opportunity to reposition our mental and physical well-being. 

Neurofeedback is a safe, non-invasive, drug-free approach to improving mental and emotional capacity.   

Peak performers increase motivation, enhance focus, report better sleep and stronger emotional balance. 

Challenges we address are symptoms of anxiety, depression, fatigue, sleep issues, trauma and pain perception. 

Children and teenagers learn better brain behaviours that translate into stronger social skills, focussed attention, reduced stress and anxiety, and as a result gain confidence and maturity. 

Age-related issues and developmental disorders can be addressed with neurofeedback

Sensory processing involves many pre-conscious brain area activation and neuronal information flows before we gain conscious awareness of impulses from our environment.  We rely on a mature activation of specialised brain areas and their smooth interfacing with relevant brain networks.  When either is compromised, we lose the ability to live in the moment, and pathologies result.  Focus, sleep, drive and mood regulation depend on an efficient functioning of our brain circuitry

With neurofeedback, we can identify which brain areas need training, and show the brain more efficient habits.  The brain now has the choice to apply what it has learned and integrate new behaviour patterns into our life.  

Neurofeedback training is non-invasive and drug-free.  Sessions involve watching a movie of choice, providing a reward to our conscious mind.  Sensors, applied comfortably with a washable, conductive paste, measure small currents (EEG) on our scalp that can be amplified and analysed real-time.  When undesired patterns are detected, the volume drops and the picture shrinks, and the brain pre-consciously adapts its behaviour to restore continuity of the film shown, i.e. the reward for our conscious mind.  Throughout a session, a learning effect can thus be observed.  

We train specific brain areas to learn a more efficient behaviour pattern.  The brain can choose to adopt this if it improves our overall functioning, and integrate better habits into our life – such as improved sleep, focus, drive and mood regulation.  Neurofeedback training is passive (for our conscious mind) and changes we make are voluntary, that is, they can be unlearned if they don’t serve a purpose. 

Neurofeedback training starts with a qEEG brain map, where we record the brain’s activity for about twenty minutes with different tasks.  Analysis of this data enables us to form a targeted, individualised training plan

Neurofeedback training sessions last between one and two hours, thus accommodating a natural ultradian attention rhythm as well as the duration of a movie.  We can train multiple sites during this time and repeat the process as needed.  Usually starting with three sessions per week, training can be adapted to be more or less frequent, and intensive courses involving two sessions per day over a week can also be accommodated.  Ten sessions will give a good indication of responsiveness, which besides subjective feedback we can ascertain with a further brain map.  Usually forty hours of neurofeedback can address most brain areas targeted,  though severity can influence this somewhat if certain brain behaviours are more ingrained. 

Our flexibility to change our surroundings, such as confronting relationships and ambitions, is key to enabling and ensconcing changes.  Neurofeedback training can be complemented with various types of therapies, including talk, touch and diet. 

Neurofeedback London-Brighton-Manchester does not provide diagnosis nor medical advice.  By engaging in neurotherapy, you confirm you have read and understood the disclaimer.

For more applications of neurofeedback training, see Who is it For?

Now also in Brighton and Manchester, contact Daniel on +44 (0)79666 99430 or email to discuss and arrange an appointment. 

Neurofeedback is a form of complementary therapy and should not be seen as a replacement for conventional medicine.  qEEG brain map-based neurofeedback training takes a more holistic approach to brain functioning, rather than just focusing on medical symptoms.  It is not intended as a form of diagnosis nor medical intervention nor medical advice per the disclaimer.

Neurofeedback for Clinicians

Daniel Webster studied neurofeedback with key founders of the field of neurofeedback in Los Angeles.  He provides consultations and bespoke training for clinicians interested in learning about neurofeedback and its applications.  

Neurofeedback is a Drug-Free, Non-Invasive Brain Training.

This website attempts to provide an overview of neurofeedback training.  By continuing to use this site you confirm that you have read and understood the Disclaimer